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Sanaullah Baloch Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur Karlos Zurutuza Selig Harrison Malik Siraj Akbar Zaffar Baloch Sanaullah Baloch: Exploitation of Mineral Wealth... Mir Mohammad Ali Talpur: Negligent dereliction of duty... Karlos Zurutuza: Inside Iran's Most Secretive... Selig Harrison: The Chinese Cozy Up... Malik Siraj Akbar: Remembering Qambar Chakar... Zaffar Baloch: Balochistan's Burden...

The Sad Truth About the Fight Against Blood Diamonds

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It is a tragic paradox of our time that poor nations with abundant resources should suffer unimaginably while their political leaders appropriate riches that might otherwise mitigate poverty and foster economic growth. This brutal phenomenon is known as the "resource curse."

Anthony Kammer: The Eternal Politics of Debt and Forgiveness

thumbnail imageRelevant reading for all who are 'occupied': A review of early Occupy Wall Street organizer David Graeber’s latest book, Debt: The First 5,000 Years.

What do occupied (freedom) and 'occupy' movements have in common?

thumbnail imageIt's becoming increasingly obvious that the real priority of those running the world for the last few decades has not been creating a viable form of capitalism, but rather, convincing us all that the current form of capitalism is the only conceivable economic system, so its flaws are irrelevant. As a result, we're all sitting around dumbfounded as the whole apparatus falls apart.

Niger Delta villagers go to the Hague to fight against oil giant Shell

thumbnail imageThis once self-sufficient community suffered from the excesses of oil firms and corrupt officials. Now, the villagers are blamed for everything and the arms dealers are having a field day

India Solar Boom: Rural Poor Give Up On Power Grid

thumbnail image"Decentralized solar installations are going to take off in a very big way and will probably be larger than the grid-connected segment." - Santosh Kamath, executive director of consulting firm KPMG in India

From before: Pakistan’s Fatal Shore

thumbnail imageWith its “Islamic” nuclear bomb, Taliban- and al-Qaeda-infested borderlands, dysfunctional cities, and feuding ethnic groups, Pakistan may well be the world’s most dangerous country, a nuclear Yugoslavia-in-the-making. One key to its fate is the future of Gwadar, a strategic port whose development will either unlock the riches of Central Asia, or plunge Pakistan into a savage, and potentially terminal, civil war.

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